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Publications

To request further information on a particular publication via email, click on the name of the author in blue.

2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 200220012000 | 1999 |

2012

Health care access in American Indian communities: A brief history of American Indian health and health management.

Health care access in American Indian communities: A brief history of American Indian health and health management.

Rainie, Stephanie Carroll, Jaime Arsenault, Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen. In preparation.

 
Indigenous peoples and the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Indigenous peoples and the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Starks, Rachel Rose and Adrian Quijada-Mascarenas. In press. In The Border Wall between Mexico and the United States. Venues, Mechanisms and Stakeholders for a Constructive Dialogue, eds. Ana Córdova, Carlos A. de la Parra and Eduardo Peters. Tlalpan, Mexico: SEMARNAT.

 
Is there only one cultural path to development? Sustainable heterogeneity among contemporary American Indian nations.

Is there only one cultural path to development? Sustainable heterogeneity among contemporary American Indian nations.

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt. In press. In Culture Matters, Culture Changes, ed. L. Harrison. Basic Books.

 
Reconstituting Native nations: Colonial boundaries and institutional innovation in Canada, Australia, and the United States.

Reconstituting Native nations: Colonial boundaries and institutional innovation in Canada, Australia, and the United States.

Cornell, Stephen. Submitted/in review. In Indigenous Lands and Land Use, ed. D. Natcher and R. Walker.

2011

Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security.

Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security.

Starks, Rachel Rose, Jen McCormack, and Stephen Cornell. 2011. Tucson, AZ: Udall Center Publications. 103 p. (book). [link]

Provides an overview of the historical and contemporary effects of international borders on the Indigenous nations of the United States and reviews ways those nations have responded to border-related challenges.

 
Derechos humanos de los pueblos Indígenas.

Foreword.

Cornell, Stephen. 2011. In Unsettling the Settler State: Creativity and Resistance in Indigenous Settler-State Governance, ed. S. Maddison and M. Brigg. Federation Press (Australia). [link]

 
Derechos humanos de los pueblos Indígenas.

Derechos humanos de los pueblos Indígenas.

Contesse, Jorge, Antonia Rivas, Laura Seelau y Ryan Seelau. 2011. In Annual Report on Human Rights 2011. Pp. 183-209. [pdf]

2010

American Indian Self-Determination: The Political Economy of a Successful Policy.

American Indian Self-Determination: The Political Economy of a Successful Policy.

Cornell, Stephen and Joseph P. Kalt. 2010. JOPNA Working Paper No. 1. Tucson, AZ: Native Nations Institute and Harvard Project. 32p. [pdf]

Examines the changing level of congressional support for the federal American Indian policy aimed at promoting self-determination, through self-governance, of federally recognized tribes.

 
Can Australia follow Obama's lead?

Can Australia follow Obama's lead?

Cornell, Stephen. 2010. Reconciliation News (publication of Reconciliation Australia), 17 (May): 18–20. [pdf]

 
Making First Nation Law: The Listuguj Mi Gmaq Fishery

Making First Nation Law: The Listuguj Mi'Gmaq Fishery.

Cornell, Stephen, Renee Goldtooth, Miriam Jorgensen, Rachel Rose Starks, and others. 2010. Report for Native Nations Institute and National Centre for First Nations Governance. 35 p. [pdf]

Describes how the Listuguj Mi'gmaq First Nation government took over the management of the salmon fishery in the Restigouche River (between the provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec).

 
Native nations and Arizona’s economy

Native nations and Arizona's economy.

Cornell, Stephen, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2010. In Building Arizona's Future: Jobs, Innovation and Competitiveness, ed. V. Pavlakovich-Kochi and J. McCormack, 119–23. Tucson: Arizona Town Hall. [pdf]

 
Return of the Red Lake Walleye

Return of the Red Lake Walleye.

Record, Ian, prod. 2010. Documentary video. DVD. 30 min. Chronicles the successful return of the walleye fisheries in Red Lake, Minn., through a partnership between the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians and the State of Minnesota. [link]

 
Children and Youth Services Review

Tribal experience with children's accounts.

Jorgensen, Miriam and Peter Morris. 2010. Children and Youth Services Review 32(11): 1528-37 [link]

2009

Becoming public sociology: Indigenous nations, dialogue, and change.

Cornell, Stephen. 2009. In Handbook of Public Sociology, ed. Vincent Jeffries. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
 

Is There Only One Path to Development? Sustainable Heterogeneity Among Contemporary American Indian Nations.

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt. In press. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

 
Per Capita Distributions of American Indian Tribal Revenues: A Preliminary Discussion of Policy Considerations.

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Stephanie C. Rainie, Ian Record, Ryan Seelau, and Rachel R. Starks. In press. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

2008

Big Sycamore
Big Sycamore Stands Alone: The Western Apaches, Aravaipa, and the Struggle for Place.

Record, Ian. 2008. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. [link]

Examines the homeland struggle of the Western Apaches, synthesizing historical and anthropological materials to provide new insights into the relationship of people and the land.
 

Borrowing Trouble: Predatory Lending in Native American Communities.

First Nations Development Institute (Miriam Jorgensen, lead author). 2008. Washington, DC: First Nations Development Institute. [link]

Analyzes the extent of predatory lending activity in Indian Country with regard to housing lending, payday lending, car title loans, loans against tax refunds, and pawn shop activity; provides recommendations on how Native nations might limit the activities of predatory lenders in their communities, including assisting borrowers who are already engaged with such lenders, educating consumers on how to avoid predatory lenders, and shutting down predatory lending through regulation and legislation.

 

encyclopedia

The Cayuse War (1848-1855); The Coeur d'Alene War (1858); Morton v Mancari (1974); The Paiute (Pyramid Lake) War (1860); The Snake War (1866-1868); The Spirit Lake Uprising (1857).

Seelau, Ryan
. 2008. In Encyclopedia of United States Indian Policy and Law, ed. Paul Finkelman and Tim Allen Garrison. Washington, DC: CQ Press. [link]

Selected entries for a two-volume encyclopedia that examines the history and impact of U.S. relations with Native Americans.
 

Determinants of Success

Deepening Our Understanding of the Financial Education of Native Youth: An In-Depth Look at Native Students in Montana, New Mexico, and South Dakota.

Anderson, William, Miriam Jorgensen, Noorie Brantmeier, and Lewis Mandell. 2008. Rapid City and Washington, DC: First Nations Oweesta Corporation and Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy. [link]

Provides an in-depth look, using the Jump$tart survey instrument, at the personal financial knowledge of Native youth in three states with high Native populations—Montana, New Mexico, and South Dakota; examines the largest sample of Native high school students ever surveyed regarding financial literacy skills.

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

Determinantes

Determinants of Development Success in the Native Nations of the United States.

Taylor, Jonathan. 2008. Cambridge and Tucson: Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Developent and Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy.[diné] [english] [español] [português]

Summarizes the elements of success for Native nation building, based on more than two decades’ research by the Harvard Project and Native Nations Institute.
 

Health care

Improving Health Care Access in Native American Communities: What Can Tribes Do?

Arsenault, Jaime, Stephen Cornell, Stephanie Carroll Rainie. 2008. Executive summary of a report to the Nathan Cummings Foundation. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [pdf]

Concludes from interviews with 18 tribal officials and employees, federal officials, and academics knowledgeable about health care delivery to Native nations, that where funds and capacity permit, tribal-managed health care improves access.

 

Leadership Development

Leadership Development in the Native American Arts & Culture Sector.

Jorgensen, Miriam, and Rachel Starks. 2008. A report commissioned by the Ford Foundation. New York: Ford Foundation. [link]

Reviews ways that the Native arts sector might cultivate and sustain leaders.
 

Political economy of american indian

The political economy of American Indian gaming.

Cornell, Stephen. 2008. Annual Review of Law and Social Science 4: 63-82. [link]

Describes the history and organization of contemporary Indian gaming operations, showing that while gaming’s effects are unevenly distributed across tribes, its political, economic, and social impacts on many Indian reservations have been significant and positive and that gaming has had positive economic effects on many non-Native communities as well, particularly in distressed areas.

 

Rights Rights, governance, and the BC treaty process.

Cornell, Stephen. 2008. In Forging Linkages & Finding Solutions (conference proceedings), 45-53. Vancouver: BC Treaty Commission. [pdf]

Keynote address.
 

Fisheries Jopna

We Are the Stewards: Indigenous-led Fisheries Innovation in North America.

Record, Ian. 2008. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Chronicles three cases (Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, Red Lake Walleye Recovery Project, and Tulalip Tribes/Snohomish Basin BioGas Project); reviews the current state of Indigenous-led fisheries management in the United States; summarizes major trends and presents common keys and challenges to the success of these efforts.

2007

Financial literacy

The Financial Literacy of Native American Youth.

Jorgensen, Miriam, and Lewis Mandell. 2007. Rapid City: National Financial Education Coalition, First Nations Oweesta Corporation. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 
Jopna 2007
Implementing the Federal Endangered Species Act in Indian Country: The Promise and Reality of Secretarial Order 3206.

Sanders, Marren. 2007. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Reviews the key requirements of the Endangered Species Act, pertinent executive orders, and Department of the Interior Secretarial Order 3206; discusses the differences tribes can make by creating and implementing their own habitat management plans, as alternatives to designation of critical habitat on Indian lands, and by actively partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Conservation Service.

 

Strengthening and Rebuilding Tribal Justice Systems

Strengthening and Rebuilding Tribal Justice Systems: A Participatory Outcomes Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Justice Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project.

Wakeling, Stewart, and Miriam Jorgensen, and others. 2007. Final report to the U.S. Department of Justice. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [pdf]

Assesses the U.S. Department of Justice’s Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project, which aimed to help participating tribes implement strategies for making the individual components of their justice systems work better together in addressing crime and related social problems.

 
The Nature and Components of Economic Development in Indian Country

Cornell, Stephen, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2007. Prepared for the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [pdf]

Defines what economic development means and how it applies in Indian Country; looks at the changing patterns of Indian Country economic development; debunks some of the myths and misconceptions about economic development in Native nations; suggests policy options for both Indigenous nations and the federal government; and calls for better ways to measure socioeconomic change in Indigenous communities.

 

Fisheries Jopna Organizing Indigenous governance in Canada, Australia, and the United States.

Cornell, Stephen. 2007. In Aboriginal Policy Research: Moving Forward, Making a Difference (Volume IV), ed. Jerry P. White, Susan K. Wingert, Dan Beavon, and Paul Maxim, 159-70. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing. [link]

Examines the recent rise of governance as an Indigenous issue; raises a number of research and policy matters related to Indigenous governance in Canada, Australia, and the United States; summarizes some preliminary findings of this comparative analysis; and lays out a further research agenda that could benefit both Indigenous and non-Indigenous policy-makers.

 

RNN
Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development.

Jorgensen, Miriam, ed. 2007. Foreword by Oren Lyons. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. [link]

Provides guidelines for creating new governance structures, rewriting constitutions, building justice systems, launching nation-owned enterprises, encouraging citizen entrepreneurs, developing new relationships with non-Native governments, and confronting the crippling legacies of colonialism.

2006

Contributions

Contributions of the Earned Income Tax Credit to Community Development in Indian Country

Wagner, Kristen, Miriam Jorgensen, Dana Klar, and Karen Edwards. 2006. Report to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2005 Native Community VITA Site Project. St. Louis: Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies and Center for Social Development, Washington University. [link]

 
Cornell

Indigenous Peoples, Poverty, and Self-Determination in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States.

Cornell, Stephen. 2006. Joint Occasional Publications on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Argues that there is strong evidence from the United States that effective solutions to indigenous poverty depend on, among other things, Indigenous self-determination; summarizes the U.S. evidence and considers its applicability to the situations of Indigenous peoples in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen. 2005. Indigenous peoples, poverty, and self-Determination in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. In Indigenous peoples and poverty: An international perspective, ed. Robyn Eversole, John-Andrew McNeish and Alberto D. Cimadamore, 199-225. London: Zed Books.

 

native nation building

Native Nation Building.

Record, Ian, prod. 2006. Ten-part CD/DVD series. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [link]

Provides critical information to the leaders of Indian nations, students in tribal colleges and other educational institutions, and other interested individuals about what’s working and what’s not among Native nations as they engage in the difficult and daunting challenge of nation building.

 

Lester
Protecting the Fish and Eating Them, Too: Impacts of the Endangered Species Act on Tribal Water Use.

Lester, Lauren. 2006. Winner of the 2005 Lillian S. Fisher Prize in Environmental Law and Policy. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy. [pdf]



Provides a general overview of tribal water rights followed by a description of the Endangered Species Act, discusses the intersection of critical habitat designation and the development of consumptive water use on reservation lands, evaluates tribal and agency recommendations regarding critical habitat designation in Indian Country, and sets out further recommendations for protecting both species habitat and tribal sovereignty.
 
Jorgensen

Statement before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Oversight Hearing on Economic Development.

Jorgensen, Miriam. 2006. In Oversight Hearing on Economic Development in Indian Country, before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, 109th Congress, Second Session, May 10, 2006, 75-95. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. [link]

Provides a 20-page review about economic development, the elements to successful economic development in Indian Country, and the implications for federal policy-making.

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 
Cornell

What Makes First Nations Enterprises Successful? Lessons from the Harvard Project.

Cornell, Stephen. 2006. Joint Occasional Publications on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Examines how the actions of Native nations themselves can either undermine or strengthen their own enterprises, focusing on five factors that Indigenous nations can control but that sometimes are ignored in the effort to build successful, nation-owned businesses: clarity about enterprise goals; effective management of the politics-business connection; the purpose, power, and composition of enterprise boards of directors; independent and reliable resolution of disputes; and the need to educate the community about enterprise goals and activity.

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen. 2005. What makes First Nations enterprises successful? Lessons from the Harvard Project.” In Legal Aspects of Aboriginal Business Development, ed. Dwight Dorey and Joseph Magnet, 51-65. Toronto: LexisNexis Canada.

2005

Jopna

Native Cultural Arts Organizations: What They Are and What They Need.

Jorgensen, Miriam, and others. 2005. Tucson and Phoenix: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Atlatl, Inc. [pdf]

Offers an analytical summary of results form a national survey of Native-controlled cultural arts organizations to gain a better understanding of the entities comprised in the sector and their needs.

 
Jopna

Seizing the Future: Why Some Native Nations Do and Others Don't.

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine A. Spilde.
2005. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Examines the question of why is it that some Native nations seize upon the nation building strategy and take effective control of their futures while others do not; finds that foundational change in a community arises when the external and internal conditions a people face interact with their interpretations of their situation, producing a new, shared “story” of what is possible, and how it can be achieved.

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine A. Spilde. 2007. Seizing the Future: Why Some Native Nations Do and Others Don't.. In Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development, ed. Miriam Jorgensen. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

 

Jopna

Two Approaches to Economic Development on American Indian Reservations: One Works, the Other Doesn't.

Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 2005. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Compares the “standard approach,” long supported by the U.S. government and by some Indian nations, to the “nation-building approach”; defines the characteristics of these two approaches; shows why the latter approach has begun to produce significant improvements in reservation socioeconomic conditions.

 

Large Foundations’ Grantmaking to Native America.

Hicks, Sarah, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2005. Cambridge: Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Summarizes the findings of a study of the amounts, sources, and targets of large private foundations’ investments in Native America.

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

2004

Jopna

The Concept of Governance and its Implications for First Nations.

Cornell, Stephen, Catherine Curtis, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Describes the critical role both governance and government play in human communities; examines what effective self-governance involves and how self-governing systems can be built, and draws distinctions between self-administration—sometimes mistaken for self-government—and genuine self-government.

 

Jopna

History's Lesson for HUD and Tribes.

Jorgensen, Miriam. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, 43 pp. [pdf]

Analyzes the differential success of the Indian Housing Authority and provides important information about the conditions under which the new tribal efforts will be successful; finds that unless the new approach addresses core issues of tribal governance, it will be inadequate for real reform of Indian housing.

 

JOPNA

Myths and Realities of Tribal Sovereignty: The Law and Economics of Indian Self-Rule.

Kalt, Joseph P., and Joseph William Singer. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, 47 pp. [pdf]

Explores legal and economic dimensions of current perceptions of (and debates over) the nature and extent of tribal self-rule in the United States, with the objective of distinguishing between myth and reality; addresses key threads of thought and assumptions that pervade, accurately or inaccurately, discussions in the public policy arena.

 

Native American Health and Welfare Policy

Native American Health and Welfare Policy in and Age of New Federalism

Merideth, Robert, and Stephanie C. Rainie, eds. 2002. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy.

Contains edited presentations from the conference, “Native American Health Issues and Welfare Policy in an Era of Devolution,” held in Tucson, Ariz., November 1998, and organized by the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at The University of Arizona, the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation, and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundations.

2003

Jopna

Reloading the Dice: Improving the Chances for Economic Development on American Indian Reservations.

Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, 2003. [pdf]

Reviews the obstacles that Indian nations face as they pursue their development goals, outlines the critical role that institutions of tribal governance play in the development process, and suggests ways that newly empowered tribal governments can improve their tribes' chances of achieving self-determined development success.

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 1992. Reloading the dice: Improving the chances for economic development on American Indian reservations.” In What Can Tribes Do? Strategies and Institutions in American Indian Economic Development, ed. Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt, 1-59. Los Angeles: American Indian Studies Center, UCLA.

 

Jopna

Alaska Native Self-Government and Service Delivery: What Works?

Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 2003. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Reviews examples of innovative Native self-governance initiatives underway in Alaska, examines the applicability to Alaska of research on indigenous self-governance in the lower forty-eight states and Canada, and considers implications for policymakers.

 

Jopna
Sovereignty and Nation-Building: The Development Challenge in Indian Country Today.

Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, 2003. [pdf]

Examines two different approaches to reservation development: the "jobs and income" approach and the "nation building" approach; explores the institutional components of the second approach, arguing that the key to this approach is tribal sovereignty.    

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 1998. Sovereignty and nation-building: The development challenge in Indian Country today, American Indian Culture and Research Journal 22(3): 187-214.

 

Jopna

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma.

Grant II, Kenneth W., Katherine A. Spilde, and Jonathan B. Taylor. 2003. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Finds that tribal governments in Oklahoma are translating revenues and employment opportunities from gaming into positive social investment.

 

Rainie Timeche

Native Nations, the Environment, and the State of California: Tribal-State Relationships and Environmental Quality.

Rainie, Stephanie C., Joan Timeche, Kylie Dickman, and Robert Merideth, eds.
2003. Proceedings of California Environmental Protection Agency’s workshop on policy for working with tribes along the California-Baja California border. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy. [pdf]

Provides a summary of the discussions at the workshop by the same name held April 14-15, 2003, in Temecula, Calif., organized by the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy (NNI) at The University of Arizona and cosponsored by the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9.

 

Building Native Nations

Building Native Nations: Environment, Natural Resources, and Governance.

Rainie, Stephanie C., ed. 2003. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation.

Contains edited presentations from the conference, “Building Native Nations: Environment, Natural Resources, and Governance,” held in Tucson, Ariz., December 2001, and organized by the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at The University of Arizona, and the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation.

2002
Current Issues in Indian Health Policy

Current Issues in Indian Health Policy (rev. ed.)

Roubideaux, Yvette. 2002. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy.

This is a revised edition of a report prepared for the conference, “Native American Health Issues and Welfare Policy in an Era of Devolution,” held in Tucson, Ariz., November 1998, and organized by the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at The University of Arizona, the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation, and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundations.

Summarizes issues in Indian health policy in the following areas: American Indian/Alaska Native population demographics and health status; sources of health care for American Indians and Alaska Natives; key Indian health legislation; changes in the Indian health care system and U.S. health care system affecting Indian health; and challenges to the federal trust responsibility.

2001
welfare, work, and american indians Welfare, Work, and American Indians: The Impact of Welfare Reform.

Brown, Eddie F., Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, and others. 2001. A report to the National Congress of American Indians. St. Louis and Tucson: Kathryn Buder Center for American Indian Studies, Washington University, and Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, The University of Arizona.

Reviews key features of the welfare reform legislation as it applies to American Indians and Indian Country, assesses the impact on Indian nations, and identifies key issues that demand attention.
2000
sovereignty, devolution, and the future of tribal-state relations Sovereignty, Devolution, and the Future of Tribal-State Relations.

Cornell, Stephen, and Jonathan Taylor. 2000. Tucson and Cambridge: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

Based on a presentation before the National Congress of American Indians mid-year session in Juneau, Alaska, June 2000.
1999
strategic, analysis for native nations Strategic Analysis for Native Nations.

Cornell, Stephen. 1999. Tucson and Cambridge: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

Provides a 30-page workbook designed to serve as an analytical tool for use by Indian nations, Indian-owned or –operated corporations or companies, Indian entrepreneurs, and other Native entities seeking to promote economic development in Native communities.

 

 

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